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TALKS and CONFERENCES

Canadian Association for Food Studies, June 1-4, 2013



CALL FOR PAPERS
Eighth Annual Assembly of the Canadian Association for Food Studies
At the Edge Exploring the Boundaries of Food Studies
June 1-4, 2013, University of Victoria Victoria, British Columbia

The Canadian Association for Food Studies (CAFS) will host its eighth
annual assembly at the University of Victoria, Victoria (BC), from
June 1–4, 2013 in conjunction with the 2013 Congress of the Humanities
and Social Sciences.

Founded in 2005, CAFS promotes critical, interdisciplinary scholarship
in the broad area of food systems: production, distribution,
consumption, and waste management. CAFS members are drawn from an
array of disciplines including adult education, agriculture,
anthropology, economics, environmental studies, health studies, home
economics, human nutrition, geography, literature, psychology,
philosophy, policy studies, public health, rural studies, sociology,
social work and urban planning. CAFS membership is open to academics,
students, policy makers, community workers, professionals,
practitioners, and others interested in food studies research.

CAFS recognizes the need for interdisciplinary research on food issues
both within and outside of academia in response to societal needs such
as informing policy makers, assessing the outcomes of community-based
work, and demonstrating the health, social, cultural, spiritual and
environmental impacts of food systems.

The 2013 CAFS conference theme, which reflects the Congress theme, is
“At the Edge: Exploring the Boundaries of Food Studies.” Our subject
matter involves the bridging of many disciplines, ideas, places, and
people. “At the edge” represents our individual and collective
exploration of these boundaries—of disciplines, methods, forms of
collaboration—and our sense of the need to embrace the periphery. The
theme of “at the edge” encourages us to reflect on the realities of
social inequality and how we can aim for greater inclusivity by
bringing more marginalized voices to the centre of food studies. This
relates to how we position food studies at larger scales—in broader
social, academic, and policy debates—and how food may engage diverse
actors, voices, and perspectives.

We invite submissions that deal with these “at the edge” questions
within (but not limited to) food production, consumption and renewal,
regional and local foodscapes, relationships between urban practices
and rural environments, as well as investigations from community
development to interdisciplinary education to crossings of art,
technology, and food.

We also encourage proposals dealing with the following ongoing CAFS
interests as they relate to interdisciplinary aspects of food or food
studies:

–– program or project evaluation
–– research or funding directions
–– research methodology and practice
–– politics and policy
–– the political economy of food and agriculture
–– ecological food and agriculture environments
–– the sociology and culture of consumption
–– activism, art and media
–– gender, ethnicity/race, class and justice
–– food insecurity and hunger
–– sustainability
–– food culture or history
–– food ethics or philosophy

SUMMARY Deadlines
Paper proposals: January 13, 2013
Pecha-kucha proposals: January 13, 2013
The Student Paper Award in Food Studies: January 13, 2013 for paper
abstract and March 1, 2013 for final paper
Award for Excellence in Public Service: March 1, 2013
Exploration Gallery: March 30, 2013

More Information available at www.foodstudies.ca.

Call for Papers: “Sugar and Beyond”

Organizers: Christopher P. Iannini, Julie Chun Kim, K. Dian Kriz


The John Carter Brown Library seeks proposals for a conference entitled “Sugar and Beyond,” to be held on October 25-26, 2013, and in conjunction with the Library’s Fall 2013 exhibition on sugar in the early modern period, especially its bibliographical and visual legacies. The centrality of sugar to the development of the Atlantic world is now well known. Sugar was the ‘green gold’ that planters across the Americas staked their fortunes on, and it was the commodity that became linked in bittersweet fashion to the rise of the Atlantic slave trade. Producing unprecedented quantities of sugar through their enforced labor, Africans on plantations helped transform life not only in the colonies but also in Europe, where consumers incorporated the luxury commodity into their everyday rituals and routines.

“Sugar and Beyond” seeks to evaluate the current state of scholarship on sugar, as well as to move beyond it by considering related or alternative consumer cultures and economies. Given its importance, sugar as a topic still pervades scholarship on the Americas and has been treated in many recent works about the Caribbean, Brazil, and other regions. This conference thus aims to serve as an occasion where new directions in the study of sugar can be assessed. At the same time, the connection of sugar to such broader topics as the plantation system, slavery and abolition, consumption and production, food, commodity exchange, natural history, and ecology has pointed the way to related but distinct areas of inquiry. Although sugar was one of the most profitable crops of the tropical Americas, it was not the only plant being cultivated. Furthermore, although the plantation system dominated the lives of African and other enslaved peoples, they focused much of their efforts at resistance around the search for ways to mitigate or escape the regime of sugar planting. We thus welcome scholars from all disciplines and national traditions interested in exploring both the power and limits of sugar in the early Atlantic world.

Topics that papers might consider include but are not limited to the following:

  • The development of sugar in comparative context
  • The rise of sugar and new conceptions of aesthetics, taste, and cultural refinement
  • Atlantic cultures of consumption
  • Coffee, cacao, and other non-sugar crops and commodities
  • Natural history and related genres of colonial description and promotion
  • Imperial botany and scientific programs of agricultural expansion and experimentation
  • Alternative ecologies to the sugar plantation
  • Plant transfer and cultivation by indigenous and African agents
  • Provision grounds and informal marketing
  • Economies of subsistence, survival, and resistance
  • Reimagining the Caribbean archive beyond sugar: new texts and methodological approaches

In order to be considered for the program, please send a paper proposal of 500 words and CV to  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . The deadline for submitting proposals is December 15, 2012.

Presenters will likely have some travel and accommodation subvention available to them.
For more information, keep checking this site or email Margot Nishimura, Deputy Director and Librarian ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ).

 

 

The John Carter Brown Library seeks proposals for a conference entitled “Sugar and Beyond,” to be held on October 25-26, 2013, and in conjunction with the Library’s Fall 2013 exhibition on sugar in the early modern period, especially its bibliographical and visual legacies. The centrality of sugar to the development of the Atlantic world is now well known. Sugar was the ‘green gold’ that planters across the Americas staked their fortunes on, and it was the commodity that became linked in bittersweet fashion to the rise of the Atlantic slave trade. Producing unprecedented quantities of sugar through their enforced labor, Africans on plantations helped transform life not only in the colonies but also in Europe, where consumers incorporated the luxury commodity into their everyday rituals and routines.

“Sugar and Beyond” seeks to evaluate the current state of scholarship on sugar, as well as to move beyond it by considering related or alternative consumer cultures and economies. Given its importance, sugar as a topic still pervades scholarship on the Americas and has been treated in many recent works about the Caribbean, Brazil, and other regions. This conference thus aims to serve as an occasion where new directions in the study of sugar can be assessed. At the same time, the connection of sugar to such broader topics as the plantation system, slavery and abolition, consumption and production, food, commodity exchange, natural history, and ecology has pointed the way to related but distinct areas of inquiry. Although sugar was one of the most profitable crops of the tropical Americas, it was not the only plant being cultivated. Furthermore, although the plantation system dominated the lives of African and other enslaved peoples, they focused much of their efforts at resistance around the search for ways to mitigate or escape the regime of sugar planting. We thus welcome scholars from all disciplines and national traditions interested in exploring both the power and limits of sugar in the early Atlantic world.

Topics that papers might consider include but are not limited to the following:

  • The development of sugar in comparative context
  • The rise of sugar and new conceptions of aesthetics, taste, and cultural refinement
  • Atlantic cultures of consumption
  • Coffee, cacao, and other non-sugar crops and commodities
  • Natural history and related genres of colonial description and promotion
  • Imperial botany and scientific programs of agricultural expansion and experimentation
  • Alternative ecologies to the sugar plantation
  • Plant transfer and cultivation by indigenous and African agents
  • Provision grounds and informal marketing
  • Economies of subsistence, survival, and resistance
  • Reimagining the Caribbean archive beyond sugar: new texts and methodological approaches

In order to be considered for the program, please send a paper proposal of 500 words and CV to  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . The deadline for submitting proposals is December 15, 2012.

Presenters will likely have some travel and accommodation subvention available to them.
For more information, keep checking this site or email Margot Nishimura, Deputy Director and Librarian ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ).

 

 

 

********************

_CALL FOR PAPERS

Call for Papers -- ITALIAN-AMERICAN FOODWAYS -- A special issue of Italian American Review
Joseph Sciorra [ This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ]

Friday, February 08, 2013 2:23 PM
To:
This special issue will build on existing scholarship in the fields of
history, anthropology, and folklore and folklife studies, and it welcomes
contributions from those working in the area of food studies. Overall, this
special issue of Italian American Review proposes to investigate a range of
historical and contemporary topics related to Italian-American foodways,
with the goal of broadening the scope of scholarly discussion and exploring
innovative approaches to research. To this end, all submissions should
demonstrate knowledge of previous scholarship and identify theoretical
perspectives. 
For more information: 
http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?llr=nzex7gda
+++++++++++++++++++++++
CFP *Sugar and Beyond?*
A multidisciplinary conference sponsored by

The John Carter Brown Library, Providence, RI

October 25-26, 2013
In order to be considered for the program, please send a paper proposal of
500 words and CV to 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 . The deadline for
submitting proposals is December 15, 2012.


Presenters will likely have some travel and accommodation subvention
available to them.

For more information: http://blogs.brown.edu/sugarandbeyond/ or email
Margot Nishimura, Deputy Director and Librarian (
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
).

__________________________

The 2013 Annual meeting of the Association for the Study of Food and Society was held this year in New York City from June 20-23. ASFS is the oldest established association for food studies, and its meetings are international gatherings of scholars, activists, and food practioners. This is THE conference for food studies. For more information, see their website: food-culture.org.  (Not to be confused with foodandculture.org!!)